Citizen Brooklyn

 

June, 2014

 

Citizen Brooklyn published two pieces of flash fiction: "Meteors" and "Stories."

 

These stories are thematically linked and deal with moments of budding maturity and realization. Both borrow heavily from my own life and can be read as a kind of an afterword to "The Turtle."

 

Artwork by Muge Karamanci accompanies the stories.

Photo © Muge Karamanci

Glassworks

Spring 2014

Glassworks Magazine published my short story, "The Turtle," in the Spring 2014 issue.

 

In this quiet story, I wanted to capture the fortitude of a family, which has recently suffered a great loss. They take joy and strength in continuing a tradition that despite the memories, is dear to them. The action, the death of the father, has already occurred, the story is found in the aftermath.

 

Read a little more about this and other stories from the Spring 2014 issue of Glassworks at the Looking Glass.

Cover art by Ira Joel Haber

Black Heart Magazine

March 27th, 2014

 

A flash fiction piece, "Ambiguous Endings" has been published by Black Heart Magazine.

 

She closed the book, placed it on the table, and finally, decided to walk through the door.

 

That was the first line you had to use in one of NPR's three-minute fiction contests. I was stumped for a while because I thought it was a terrible first line, At some point, it dawned on me that I could use it as a line of dialogue. The story of screenwriting partners, a love triangle, and beginnings and endings grew from there.

“Ambiguity” image by Flickr user Yogesh Mhatre

Monongahela Review

Issue Eight

The Monongahela Review published my short story, "A Play for Tamara," in Late 2012-Early 2013.

I began writing "A Play for Tamara," while driving back east at the end of my first year of graduate school. I drew on an odd experience seeing an old friend act in an outlandish performance of "Phaedra's Love" the summer after college. Like a younger version of myself, the protagonist has just graduated college and before embarking on adventures and adulthood, has a lot to learn about the nature of lust.

Cover art by Serena Niesley

Inertia Magazine

Issue Twelve

Inertia Magazine published a short story of mine, "Family Detective," in June, 2012.

"Family Detective" began from a writing assignment in which I was given a list of items in a teenage boy's bedroom. I imagined the room being kept in a kind of stasis by the boy's mother after her son's unimaginable suicide senior year of high school. Like the protagonist of this story, I drew on many years of watching Law & Order to attempt to explain how such a promising young man could end his life.

Cover art by Michael Padwee

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